4 o’clock in the Morning

Whelp, it is indeed 4AM here in Arizona as I sit here typing this out. I didn’t sleep hardly at all, maybe two hours at the most. I had a horrid migraine yesterday and slept most of the morning away. That afternoon though I sorted out some of the insurance kinks with my getting in to see a surgeon.

I’m sorry I haven’t updated you guys about this it was just kinda a lot to take in. OK. On November 7th I had a Metabolic Stress Test performed, these results showed that I am deconditioned (duh). They also showed that I have PVC’s, premature ventricular contractions, (extra heartbeats) that are continuous throughout the exercise period (they also are consistent with my daily living and are showing up on the 30-day Holter monitor I’m currently wearing). Most importantly this stress test showed my symptoms, the fainting, shortness of breath, palpitations, chest pains, racing heart, etc. aren’t all caused by my deconditioned state. Something else is wrong. Right now we are blaming my Pectus Excavatum; the way that my ribs dip inward to create a short of pocket when they meet at my sternum. Now mine’s nowhere near severe as the ones I’ve seen (mostly in Marfan Syndrome peeps), but I’m a lady and well, boobs. They kinda obscure the severity. This is why I’m making an appointment with the surgeon.

pectuschest

I am calling to schedule an appointment with a surgeon at PCH so that we can discuss what will be the best type of testing and scans to proceed with to decide if I am a good candidate for the Nuss Procedure. We wouldn’t want to do anything unnecessary like say two CT scans mere weeks apart since we didn’t get the right depth the first time. I trust my cardiologist for referring me to the surgery clinic and would much rather keep it in the Hospital than have to go to Banner and possibly need to see Their surgeon, plus Their cardiologist for referral to the surgeon, plus Their primary care for pre-op clearance etc. It’s much better and less stressful to keep it in the PCH family since their records are as easy to pull up as Facebook if your in network.

Onto the Nuss procedure. In laments terms they’d be sliding a bar into my chest through two incisions on the side of my chest, this bar would pull my ribcage out and hold it there for a specific amount of time determined by my surgeon. After that amount of time, the bar would then be removed through one of the same side incisions. My chest would be a normal bell shape and all would be good, my symptoms relived or greatly diminished (since I still have low blood pressure when changing positions and exercising, the procedure would not alleviate the symptoms related to that). It is minimally invasive, I would need an epidural catheter and believe me those look very intimidating. It would be a 7 day hospital stay max if my pain wasn’t easy to control ( I pray that it will be, but my body is a sucker for pain and pain meds don’t always do it for me) And I would be sent home with exercises to do and told to keep my posture near perfect. I’m actually hoping that this procedure would help my posture, I’m thinking it might be causing me to slump and roll my shoulders forward because my chest isn’t out straight and flat.  Who knows, there are many potentially benefits to this procedure, we just have to find out if it’s  a right fit for me.

Rough Go Of It

I send my sincerest apologies as for the past month I have been extremely unwell. The first week of October was my first week of fall break from school. I was just generally run down and feeling drained. A migraine was bound to happen from my interrupted sleep schedule and it came and went at its leisure throughout most of fall break which ran until the 18th (almost 20 days of break awesome!). My sleep schedule now consists of taking at least 45 minutes to an hour to fall asleep and waking up at least 3 or 4 times, sometimes 5, and then struggling again to fall back asleep. The last week of break and into the first week of school, I of course came down with a fever, chills, hot flashes, vomiting, increased dizziness and fainting, the works. That lasted about a week and I was more or less bed bound and slept for the majority of the time to avoid the awful temperature changes that wrecked havoc on my autonomic nervous system. I missed the first three days back to school.

The fever finally broke and I was feeling good, but the migraine that comes anytime I get sick was still lingering. I decided that I needed to get it gone and attempt school, so we went to the ER. They gave me Dexamethasone and it worked. They believed I had a UTI and maybe that was what had prompted the migraine; they gave me antibiotics for it (turns out I actually didn’t have a UTI so I stopped the antibiotics). Also after a few pokes, the nurse had to get out a ultra sound machine just to find what she called my “baby veins”; they also used a baby catheter. I went home feeling pretty alright and at a good manageable level. This lasted until a bitter-sweet surprise landed in lap.

 

My neurologist called; my Botox appointment could be moved up because someone canceled! How sweet! So Tuesday the 17th was scheduled and I was ready to try something new to get rid of my migraine plague. I went to school Tuesday and a few morning classes on Wednesday. Then it was off to the neurologist! The Botox was done, we left, and a few hours later I noticed a slight headache coming on; I ignored it and figured it was from the needles and such. The next day I woke up with a pounding migraine and could barely move, this was not good. The migraine lasted a long time. A few days later a stiff neck set in, so sore I couldn’t turn my head and had to turn my whole body to look at something. The migraine makes my head feel foggy and like I can’t think straight, so homework and school don’t really work. I mean sometimes I stop mid sentence and stare at you for a full minute because I genuinely forgot what I was talking about while I was talking about it. I missed the rest of the week of school.

We headed to the ER on Sunday afternoon to try to give me some relief; I had already maxed out on my home rescue meds. This time the nurse took one look at my (non-existent) veins and brought in the ultra sound machine BEFORE poking me. She also agreed my veins were small and hidden away. They give me Haldol this time and it worked decently. It helped and I was able to go home at a reasonable level. It lasted about two or three days. Again. I went to school Monday and went about trying to catch up, stressing about some of my more in depth classes like Anatomy and College Algebra. and Tuesday I was pulled out half way for my new cardiologist appointment. My new cardiologist is amazing but we will get into that later. So I again didn’t make it through a full week of school; missing Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday to much dismay. I am now very much stressed and frustrated that my body is not cooperating with my educational goals. I am however still on track to graduate, it just may be a little different schedule unfortunately.

On to my new cardiologist. I really like him, he seems knowledgeable and invested in helping me feel like myself again. We had real conversations about my life and his experiences with other circumstances similar to mine. We connected on a personal level; I already trust him. Right away he put me on a 30 day Holter monitor, as he says ” a 24 hour monitor scares away arrhythmias”. We meet again in two weeks where we will discuss if we need to change meds, start an exercise program, and where I will talk to him about the possibility of IV saline infusions as a treatment option if he has no other medications or treatments to offer. I really think the infusions could be helpful as they increase blood volume and help with dehydration; that’s a huge problem when I get migraines as well because my nausea is so bad I can’t hardly drink. My new cardio said I have Neurocardiogenic Syncope, the infusions could help with the near constant dizziness and chronic fainting and blackouts that come along with that by pumping up blood volume and helping with my blood pressure when it drops. We will see what plans he has, and what test he wants to runs, and what steps he wants to take. I believe we can work together and find answers and treatments.

So again, I’m sorry I left y’all hanging for a while but chronic illness is unpredictable. You never know when you are going to flare or have a series of bad days. So I hope I got y’all caught up and I will attempt to go back to regularly scheduled blogging. Thanks everyone for reading! 🙂 ❤

ER Trips and PICCs

So I started this entry exactly a week ago. Exactly a week ago I went to the ER for the first time since the end of February. Of course like always I was admitted, a PICC line was placed, and DHE, a migraine treatment that restricts the blood vessels in your body,  began flowing through my  tired veins. This ER trip was brought on by more than just a 6 day migraine though. I fainted twice and fell four times in a 24 hour period. I was weak, shaky, and my blood pressure was incredibly low. At one point it hit 76/60 with my heart rate at 153. I called my cardiologist’s office to ask for advice since I never seem to know whether or not I need to go to the ER after I faint. The nurse told me I probably should go because my doctor didn’t get in until Thursday, so off to the ER we went. There, they went through their headache protocol steps; Toradol, Benadryl, Reglan, magnesium sulfate, etc. Meanwhile I went through 3 IVs, BTW my veins suck.  After the mag doesn’t help or only helps a little, depending on the migraine, they send me upstairs to a room of my own. Usually I spend 4-6 days in the hospital receiving DHE and the pre-meds  (Toradol, Benadryl, some form of anti nausea) through my PICC line, which I’ve had 7 of. This trip was a little different though as I needed extra anti-nausea meds to help me keep my guts un-chucked, we used Zofran and a Scopalamine patch then waited the full 30 minutes before administering the DHE. Most times I still threw up, it’s the luck of the meds I guess. Honestly I frequent my local hospital so much and they pump such hard drugs into my veins that they might as well just give me a Port…ya right, in my dreams. Because they won’t do Port-a-caths for migraine patients even if they frequent the ER every month. Ignore my rant I get frustrated about my lack of good veins.

On to good news. My neurology appointment is tomorrow and I have billions of questions to ask her.  I’m going to ask her about my neck pain and cervical instability, my seizure variant episode, hypovolemia and how it could affect my migraines while on my period, do I need a MRI since I’ve never had one, and memory testing because I literally can’t remember shit.  I’m also really sad because I might be leaving this neurologist soon, it all depends on whether or not she’ll see me until I’m out of high school. It’s just so stressful trying to find a neurologist under my insurance I really hope I can stay with her. Well, I think I’ll end here for tonight so happy readings y’all.